12 Comments

  1. Bill Jones, Jr.
    July 2, 2012 @ 3:06 pm

    Rape – whether the victime fights or is submissive – seems to be a common theme. Even in Japanese pornography, it usually features a nice, submissive woman being forced (who, of course, eventually enjoys it). The Japanese, like some African nations, also seemed to use rape as a war tact.

    Reply

    • alicamckennajohnson
      July 2, 2012 @ 6:08 pm

      This is a new revelation for me and does explain a lot of what I have seen in movies and such. It’s interesting how different cultures have grown and what quirks, habits, faults, they have formed.

      Reply

      • Bill Jones, Jr.
        July 3, 2012 @ 1:10 pm

        Yes, for instance, the Japanese equivalent of the fake female arousal moan, is to sound as if she is crying. Ew.

        Reply

        • alicamckennajohnson
          July 3, 2012 @ 3:45 pm

          Ick- I am now tempted to study sexual practices and preferences in other countries- it’s so interesting!

          Reply

  2. Karen McFarland
    July 2, 2012 @ 9:21 pm

    I am sitting here with my green tea Alica while I read your post and leave a comment. I think you covered the subject of Samuri Japan very well. I do see that you favored the author Laura Joh Rowland. Perhaps she wrote more about that time period that others. A very interesting historical lesson about Japan. Thank you! :)

    Reply

    • alicamckennajohnson
      July 3, 2012 @ 1:41 am

      I probably would have read Cloud of Sparrows- the other authors- if it had been in my house. But I do really enjoy Laura’s books. My TBR list is so long that I have to wait until I read another one of hers. If you like mysteries I would highly recommend them,.

      Reply

  3. Reetta Raitanen
    July 2, 2012 @ 11:32 pm

    Shogun Japan was such a fascinating era. Thank you so much for these book recommendations. My literary knowledge is so far made of fact and James Clavell’s old classic Shogun.

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    • alicamckennajohnson
      July 3, 2012 @ 1:45 am

      I haven’t read that one. I really enjoed the books, but man shogun Japan was an odd place.

      Reply

  4. Kilian Metcalf
    July 4, 2012 @ 6:04 pm

    I second the recommendation of Clavell’s Shogun. He loved Japan, its history and culture. I think it started when he was a prisoner of war in the infamous Changi prison camp. He studied his captors and tried to understand them. The character Peter Marlowe in King Rat is a thinly disguised version of himself. I have read and read his books many times and share his love of all things Japanese. Well, maybe not Hello, Kitty, and other infantile things, but pretty much anything Japanese interests me. Japan is my dream trip. Some of my favorite films are Japanese: Rashomon, Departures, Lost in Translation, Spirited Away, My Friend Totorro, anything by Akira Kurosawa. I fell in love with Zen philosophy when I was in college, but never practiced. Grew up in the atomic age, so cowered in my seat when Godzilla and Rodan stomped around. Just the words “Van Allen radiation belt” give me a frisson to this day.

    Reply

    • alicamckennajohnson
      July 6, 2012 @ 4:52 am

      LOL- Hello Kitty rocks!
      You’ve listed some of my favorite films too, as you know :) The next time we travel to Shogun Japan I will have to read Shogun, I’ve heard so many wonderful things about it!
      Thanks Kilian.

      Reply

  5. Nigel Blackwell
    July 6, 2012 @ 4:24 pm

    HI Alica

    Japanese culture is a mystifying mix of modern western and ancient Japanese thought. I enjoyed myself over there, the people of very nice, but just as you start to feel comfortable, something out of the ordinary happens. Sounds like their books are similar :)

    Cheers!

    Reply

    • alicamckennajohnson
      July 7, 2012 @ 1:54 am

      How fun, I would love to live in another country. Even though you can learn a lot from books and movies it’s nothing like being able to live there.
      Thanks Nigel!

      Reply

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